Research Day 2015

Research DayOn Tuesday, April 28th, 2015, Touro College held its Fourth Annual Research Day at the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine/Touro College of Pharmacy campus in Harlem.  This was a great opportunity for faculty and students to showcase their recent research and share it with the Touro community.  Many people came to take part in this special event, including deans from graduate and undergraduate divisions and members of senior administration. Continue reading

The Poetic Art of Weeding Books

No, not that kind of weeding! (CC image by Barbara Carr)

No, not that kind of weeding! (CC image by Barbara Carr)

At the Lander College for Women’s library, an ongoing weeding project is in effect to withdraw books. This reevaluation accomplishes a number of goals. It allows the library to make room on the shelves for new materials and to recycle books to where they will do the most good, either by reassigning them to a new location or donating them to Better World Books. Continue reading

Earth Day: Celebrating Conservation and Nature

(CC image by )

(CC image by D Debraj)

Earth Day is celebrated every year on April 22nd. The purpose of Earth Day is to bring awareness to environmental issues, lobby for environmental policies, and promote changes in human behaviors in order to maintain the ecosystem. Earth Day was first celebrated on April 22, 1970. Today, it is observed in more than 192 countries with more than 1 billion people participating. It is largest civil observance in the world. Continue reading

Family heirloom: In Memory of the Holocaust

Kos Eliyahu

April 15, 2015 is Yom Ha’Shoah or Holocaust Remembrance day.

This Kos Eliyahu belonged to my father’s uncle, Robert Ludwig Adler. He was imprisoned during WWII in Camp de Gurs, in southwest France, before being deported to Auschwitz, where he perished.  Continue reading

Guest Post: OTA Students Participate in NYSOTA Advocacy Day

Visiting Legislative offices to educate about OT issues

Visiting Legislative offices to educate about OT issues

On March 3rd, 2015 Touro College Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) students again participated with enthusiasm in the New York State Occupational Therapy Association’s (NYSOTA) annual Advocacy Day, focusing on the issue of COTA (Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant) licensure. Continue reading

Calling all students on rotations! Evidence is at your Fingertips.

Touro College now has access to an exciting new resource specifically formulated for point of care use!

courtesy of EBSCOhost

courtesy of EBSCOhost

What is DynaMed?

DynaMed is a clinical reference tool created by physicians for physicians and health care professionals for clinical/point of care use.  DynaMed provides current evidence-based information that is accessible anytime, anywhere.

Continue reading

There is always time to honor Women in History!

Image Credit: University of Memphis

March is Women’s History Month!  Indeed, the end of the month is nearing, but it isn’t too late to honor the women in your lives: mothers, sisters, wives, teachers and those women today, and in history, who followed their hearts and dreams, took risks, stood up against injustices and fought for the freedoms and rights that some of us benefit from today.

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Guest Post: Prepared or neurotic? You tell me!

NYC Subway Train (CC0 image via Wikimedia)

NYC Subway Train (CC0 image via Wikimedia)

The following post was contributed by Shoshana Yehudah, Director of Emergency Perparedness for Touro College.

My job as Director of Emergency Preparedness has made me sensitive to being prepared for emergency situations of any kind. I carry a hand sanitizer at all times, a mini package of paper towels, a light stick for blackouts, a smoke hood for train fires, and even heated insoles for those really cold days. I’m like Felix the Cat with a bag of magic tricks. My family, friends and colleagues all tease me about how serious I am about preparedness; my boss calls me Typhoid Mary because I’m always talking about the latest epidemic. Okay, so maybe I am a little neurotic about the whole thing, but I see it as being practical and don’t give a flying fig what others think about it. Which makes this story so out of character for me. Continue reading

Celebrating Spring: The Persian New Year

Spring flowers! Tulips & Hyacinth. (CC0 image via Pixabay)

Spring flowers! Tulips & Hyacinth. (CC0 image via Pixabay)

The Persian New Year begins on the first day of Spring, which in 2015 is on March 20th.  It is called Norooz, which stands for New Day.  Though its origin goes back to the faith of Zoroastrians, this day has been celebrated for over three thousand years, by almost every Iranian, as well as by other countries that have been influenced by this Persian tradition over the centuries.  It is considered a secular holiday, and therefore religion and ethnicity differences are put aside during this time of celebration. Continue reading

Are Libraries Becoming Obsolete? A Decade Retrospective

Libraries, from medieval to modern (Old Library at St. John's Cambridge and Touro Kew Garden Hills)

More computers, less vellum: Libraries from medieval to modern (Old Library at St. John’s Cambridge and Touro Kew Garden Hills)

The other day, our Information Literacy Service Director, Sara Tabaei,  approached me about updating an article I had written in 2005 entitled: “Are Libraries Becoming Obsolete?” I agreed and thought it would be a good idea to revisit the topic and reflect over whether my initial thoughts still held.  Continue reading

Librarian Reacts to Change, part II

Melvil Dewey Can’t Land Punch.  Librarian of Congress Poised for Victory. (source)

Melvil Dewey Can’t Land Punch. Librarian of Congress Poised for Victory. (source)

[Continued from Librarians React to Change, part I] Academic and research libraries are not fans of the Dewey decimal system, and they employ other organizational schemes.  The Library of Congress (LC) classification system arranges books using an alphanumeric call number system.  It spans the alphabet from A to Z, although it ignores the W’s and a range of Q’s.  While subject headings are constantly updated and expanded, they are fit within the existing call numbers.  The National Library of Medicine (NLM) utilizes the letters unused in LC to classify medical books with a high degree of specificity.  If you would like to see a guide to the classification systems, click here. Which classification system should a large library use? I can picture a melee of librarians duking it out for classification supremacy. Continue reading

Librarian Reacts to Change, part I

edvard munch scream

Oh no! The horror! (“The Scream,” Edvard Munch)

A periodical typically indicates its purpose and intended audience, and Lucky Magazine is no exception.  Emblazoned on its cover is the phrase “Lucky—The Magazine about Shopping.”  Now that’s something I can get behind.  I like to keep up with trends I am not going to follow.  No hottest coat for chilly days or “ridiculously good riding boots” for me.  Clearly, the intended audience for this magazine skews younger than I; nevertheless, it’s a fun read.  As a librarian, how can I resist flipping through the pages? The content within may hold the answer to my next reference question. Continue reading