Welcome week at the Ave J campus

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Photo by Kirk Snyder

On September 25th and 26th the Ave J Touro campus held a welcome event for the students. Essentially this Meet and Greet, which was hosted by the Advisement office, was an occasion for the students to interact with staff. Continue reading

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Celebrating Sukkot

A sukkah from inside. (From Wikimedia user Muu-karhu)
A sukkah from inside (via Wikimedia user Muu-karhu)

After the solemnity and introspection of the High Holy Days, Sukkot, the Festival of Booths, is always a treat. Like the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel, I look forward to Sukkot every year because this holiday, unlike Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, is an unaltered celebration.  After the Exodus from Egypt, the ancient Jews traveled the wilderness for forty years before reaching the land of Israel. They lived in small huts called “sukkot” during this time. The holiday of Sukkot commemorates those temporary dwellings: Orthodox Jewish families build a small hut, or Sukkah, outside the house where they eat all meals for the seven days of the holiday. Many Orthodox Jews also sleep outdoors in the Sukkah. A typical Sukkah would look something like this:

(source)
(source)

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Quick & Easy Citations with Databases

Citations got you down? There’s an easier way! (CC image by Peter Alfred Hess)

When your professor asks you to cite your sources in APA (or MLA, AMA, APSA, ASFDKJ…), what do you do? If you’re a traditionalist, you might consult a style manual like Purdue OWL and type them out by hand, searching out each piece of information and formatting it accordingly. If you’re looking for a shortcut, Microsoft Word can help you out, or a number of websites like citationmachine.net or easybib.com. Those are all fine options, but I think there’s an easier way. Whether you find your research using QuickSearch, one of the library databases, or even Google Scholar, most modern databases will automatically cite your sources for you, if you know where to look. Continue reading

Be the Head not the Tail: Symbolism and the Food of Rosh Hashanah

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Source: pixabay.com

The first time I celebrated Rosh Hashanah in Israel I received the shock of my life. I was with my sister in the grocery store shopping for the holiday and right before us was the head of a sheep: teeth, eyes and all…I’m not going to lie: I might have become a squeamish girl for a few seconds, then I was intrigued.

“They use this?” I asked my sister.

“Wild, isn’t it?” she said.

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As Seen on TV

I like to be entertained early and often. Once I dated a guy who took me to the movies weekly. I did not have strong feelings for him, but I really did love the movies. The break-up left me missing only first run feature films. It is no surprise then, when tasked with crafting a library research project, I would select a topic near and dear to my heart. I examined media, my first and only true love, and how it is related to reading choice.  Continue reading

Insights from Touro Graduates

It might only be September, but it’s never too early to think about what you’re working towards
(image © Touro College)

If you’re just starting college, or even if you’ve been at it for a few semesters, you’ve probably gotten advice from lots of people – professors, friends, parents, acquaintances – whether you wanted it or not. Librarians aren’t shy about handing out advice either, but for today, we thought we’d share some words of wisdom from those most likely to know what you’re experiencing, because they’ve recently been right where you are. Here are excerpts from the speeches given by the valedictorian and salutatorian of last year’s graduating NYSCAS class, Yasmin Itshakov and Eleanor Moquete. We hope that you’ll find inspiration and guidance for a successful fall semester and along your path to your own moment on the graduation stage. Continue reading

Staff Profiles: Meet Dora Isakova

Dora Isakova, Library Assistant

Hello, my name is Dora Isakova.  I moved to the US in 1997 from the former Soviet Union. I was born in Uzbekistan, in the city of Tashkent, and my native language is Russian. While in the former Soviet Union, I attended the Pedagogical Institute and received my BS in Education, after which I was certified as a teacher of elementary school and fine arts. In the US, I attended Touro College and received my BS in Human Services, with a concentration in Gerontology, in 2003. Continue reading

Alcatraz: Not Just an Abandoned Prison

Alcatraz at sunset (CC image via )

Recently, I took a vacation to San Francisco, California. I had never been there before, and I have no shame: I wanted to cram as many touristy experiences possible into my week-long trip. Visit the Golden Gate Bridge? Of course! Head down to Fisherman’s Wharf? Sure! Book a ferry months in advance to visit Alcatraz? …Well, what’s so interesting about an old prison? We have one of those on the East Coast; how different could it be? I really didn’t care about hearing about Al Capone or the “Birdman” for the thousandth time (I know a few people who really like crime documentaries). What I didn’t realize was that Alcatraz has a much more complex history. Continue reading