New Staff Profile: Natasha Hollander

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Lander College for Women Librarian Natasha Hollander

Where else have you lived? 

I grew up in Staten Island until I was around 10 years old when my father’s job took us to Maryland.  I lived there until I was about 21, then moved back to the New York area but settled in Brooklyn instead of Staten Island because of its proximity to the city and its large center of Jewish life.

What languages do you speak?

I speak English (obviously) and am conversant in Hebrew; my understanding far outweighs my speaking ability when it comes to conversational Hebrew. I also can sign a little bit in ASL (American Sign Language). Continue reading

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My Internet Addiction

Internet, You Have My Undivided Attention!

 

 

 

 

 

The start of the day requires ritual, and each person’s daily ritual is different. Some people go to worship; some go for a run; some go for a cigarette. I go online. My day does not begin until I sit at the kitchen table with a cup of coffee and my Kindle Fire. I’ve got to tell you, that Kindle is my favorite thing. If I were Oprah, it would be at the top of my list. Continue reading

How to live with the “beef allergy”

 

lonestartickI have lived in eastern Long Island for 31 years. I have always had cats and our yard always has had a Disney level of wildlife pass through. We are located right by the Rocky Point Natural Resources Management Area formerly known as the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), which has 6000 acres to walk and bike ride. This area was an extension of my yard. Some years, there would be bad tick years. Now, it is just bad all the time. We don’t go biking or hiking anymore. I do my best not to leave my deck and do not walk around my yard to reduce my tick exposure. Continue reading

3 Reasons To Love Istanbul

(CCO Image via Pixabay)

The following has been contributed by  author Semih Gencer. Semih is an international student, originally from Turkey, currently attending the Touro Graduate School of Business.

“If the Earth were a single state, Istanbul would be its capital.” – Napoleon Bonaparte

My hometown of Istanbul is the only city in the world that spans two continents: Asia and Europe. The Bosphorus River, meandering through the heart of the city, combines the waters of the Black Sea and Marmara Sea. For that reason, as one article describes, for thousands of years, Istanbul was one of most aspired to cities in the world. It was a city that everyone wanted, and it was all because of its location. We can say that Istanbul has for a long time been the heart and soul of Turkey. It has a huge history. Istanbul has been the capital city of four empires: the Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman Empires. Istanbul has a rich history, and so much remains of each of these empires that you can still see. There is much interesting historical information about Istanbul, but if you ask me why I love Istanbul a lot, I have strong reasons to explain in the following parts. Continue reading

Celebrating Sukkot

A sukkah from inside. (From Wikimedia user Muu-karhu)
A sukkah from inside (via Wikimedia user Muu-karhu)

After the solemnity and introspection of the High Holy Days, Sukkot, the Festival of Booths, is always a treat. Like the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel, I look forward to Sukkot every year because this holiday, unlike Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, is an unaltered celebration.  After the Exodus from Egypt, the ancient Jews traveled the wilderness for forty years before reaching the land of Israel. They lived in small huts called “sukkot” during this time. The holiday of Sukkot commemorates those temporary dwellings: Orthodox Jewish families build a small hut, or Sukkah, outside the house where they eat all meals for the seven days of the holiday. Many Orthodox Jews also sleep outdoors in the Sukkah. A typical Sukkah would look something like this:

(source)
(source)

Continue reading

Quick & Easy Citations with Databases

Citations got you down? There’s an easier way! (CC image by Peter Alfred Hess)

When your professor asks you to cite your sources in APA (or MLA, AMA, APSA, ASFDKJ…), what do you do? If you’re a traditionalist, you might consult a style manual like Purdue OWL and type them out by hand, searching out each piece of information and formatting it accordingly. If you’re looking for a shortcut, Microsoft Word can help you out, or a number of websites like citationmachine.net or easybib.com. Those are all fine options, but I think there’s an easier way. Whether you find your research using QuickSearch, one of the library databases, or even Google Scholar, most modern databases will automatically cite your sources for you, if you know where to look. Continue reading

Be the Head not the Tail: Symbolism and the Food of Rosh Hashanah

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Source: pixabay.com

The first time I celebrated Rosh Hashanah in Israel I received the shock of my life. I was with my sister in the grocery store shopping for the holiday and right before us was the head of a sheep: teeth, eyes and all…I’m not going to lie: I might have become a squeamish girl for a few seconds, then I was intrigued.

“They use this?” I asked my sister.

“Wild, isn’t it?” she said.

Continue reading

As Seen on TV

I like to be entertained early and often. Once I dated a guy who took me to the movies weekly. I did not have strong feelings for him, but I really did love the movies. The break-up left me missing only first run feature films. It is no surprise then, when tasked with crafting a library research project, I would select a topic near and dear to my heart. I examined media, my first and only true love, and how it is related to reading choice.  Continue reading