Find Free Scholarly Research with Open Access Repositories

Since this week is the official Open Access Week, (October 22-28), we like to draw your attention to the plethora of Open Access (OA) scholarly material that is available online via different repositories, some of which we have mentioned in this article and you can find through Touro Libraries.

OA refers to material that is published online, for free, without most copyright and licensing restrictions. Much of it is published under a Creative Commons license. It is important to note that OA material is published with the full consent of the copyright holder, not pirated in any way. Scholarly journal publishing has never been a money-making endeavor for the writers so they are not giving up any kind of financial benefits by publishing OA.     Continue reading

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What’s for dinner? Answers through the ages from the NYPL

Lager Beer Saloon Menu, 1900
Kosher Victorian Restaurant menu, 1900 from NYPL menu collection: http://menus.nypl.org/menus/15689

We’ve all heard that avocado toast is the centerpiece of the millennial brunch, but have you ever wondered what your (great-)grandparents might have ordered when they were your age? Or maybe seeing the en vogue cocktails served at the Tavern on the Green in Central Park in years gone by might pique your interest? If you’re a history major or buff, perhaps you’d be keen to know how rationing during the war years affected restaurants? The NYPL’s Menu Collection (one of their many digital projects) can answer all those questions, plus raise a few more (mock turtle soup, anyone?). Continue reading

MLA: Help for Citing All Kinds of Sources

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I am a self-admitted nerd, and during the early January blizzard and sub-zero temperatures, I ventured out through wind and snow to join many fellow nerds at the MLA’s annual convention. Now, to most people, “MLA” is synonymous with burdensome citation rules, but the organization, whose full name is the Modern Language Association, actually encompasses academic research from all sorts of topics in literature and the humanities. The convention in January had panels by scholars on Shakespeare, fantasy literature, Renaissance epics, Leonard Cohen’s poetry, and many other topics near and dear to my heart.  Continue reading

Libraries are the Road to Take!

 

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Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash

While wandering through the woods of information, would you blindly follow a path because one of the trees has a beautiful signpost that appeals to you, even though you have not read the content or verified the source? Of course not. You would stop to read all of the signs before following the path; your choice would be educated from reading all the signs and verifying the source, so you would not end up in darkness.  Going with your gut is another uneducated choice and leads you down a shadowed path. Only through careful research and studying can you find the facts you are looking for.  While there are many resources to assist with research, one easy-to-use one is the library and your librarians. National Library Week is a wonderful time to get to know your library and the resources it offers you. Continue reading

2017 Customer Satisfaction Survey: The Results Are In! (Part I)

survey blog

In December, we ran our annual User Satisfaction Survey asking students, faculty, and staff about their experiences with Touro libraries over the past year. We strive to provide the best possible service, so your feedback is very important to us. Check out the results of the survey below, and let us know any additional thoughts you have in the comments.

We are very happy to announce that over 94% of you said that the service Touro Libraries provide meets or exceeds “your expectations for an excellent library.” We had 205 respondents this year. So thank you for your positive feedback!

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Have You Heard Any Good Books Lately? (Part 2)

Copyright: Carol Schapiro
Audiobooks Can Be Moving

I am a late adopter of all things technological. I am not saying I am opposed to it; it’s more like I’m not exposed to it. So when Dr. Marianne Cooper, Professor Emeritus of Queens College Graduate School of Library and Information Studies, insisted that listening to audiobooks is considered “reading”, I insisted otherwise.  I refused to believe that listening to a book was more than a shortcut taken by those either unable or unwilling to read an ACTUAL book.  Despite this, an online search revealed that while some believe listening to a book is cheating, the brain processes audiobooks and text similarly.  Good to know!  So, for the purpose of this blog posting, I decided it is time for my brain to give audiobooks a chance, and to recount my experience with them to you.

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Quick & Easy Citations with Databases

Citations got you down? There’s an easier way! (CC image by Peter Alfred Hess)

When your professor asks you to cite your sources in APA (or MLA, AMA, APSA, ASFDKJ…), what do you do? If you’re a traditionalist, you might consult a style manual like Purdue OWL and type them out by hand, searching out each piece of information and formatting it accordingly. If you’re looking for a shortcut, Microsoft Word can help you out, or a number of websites like citationmachine.net or easybib.com. Those are all fine options, but I think there’s an easier way. Whether you find your research using QuickSearch, one of the library databases, or even Google Scholar, most modern databases will automatically cite your sources for you, if you know where to look. Continue reading

As Seen on TV

I like to be entertained early and often. Once I dated a guy who took me to the movies weekly. I did not have strong feelings for him, but I really did love the movies. The break-up left me missing only first run feature films. It is no surprise then, when tasked with crafting a library research project, I would select a topic near and dear to my heart. I examined media, my first and only true love, and how it is related to reading choice.  Continue reading