2017 Customer Satisfaction Survey: The Results Are In! (Part I)

survey blog

In December, we ran our annual User Satisfaction Survey asking students, faculty, and staff about their experiences with Touro libraries over the past year. We strive to provide the best possible service, so your feedback is very important to us. Check out the results of the survey below, and let us know any additional thoughts you have in the comments.

We are very happy to announce that over 94% of you said that the service Touro Libraries provide meets or exceeds “your expectations for an excellent library.” We had 205 respondents this year. So thank you for your positive feedback!

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Have You Heard Any Good Books Lately? (Part 2)

Copyright: Carol Schapiro
Audiobooks Can Be Moving

I am a late adopter of all things technological. I am not saying I am opposed to it; it’s more like I’m not exposed to it. So when Dr. Marianne Cooper, Professor Emeritus of Queens College Graduate School of Library and Information Studies, insisted that listening to audiobooks is considered “reading”, I insisted otherwise.  I refused to believe that listening to a book was more than a shortcut taken by those either unable or unwilling to read an ACTUAL book.  Despite this, an online search revealed that while some believe listening to a book is cheating, the brain processes audiobooks and text similarly.  Good to know!  So, for the purpose of this blog posting, I decided it is time for my brain to give audiobooks a chance, and to recount my experience with them to you.

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Quick & Easy Citations with Databases

Citations got you down? There’s an easier way! (CC image by Peter Alfred Hess)

When your professor asks you to cite your sources in APA (or MLA, AMA, APSA, ASFDKJ…), what do you do? If you’re a traditionalist, you might consult a style manual like Purdue OWL and type them out by hand, searching out each piece of information and formatting it accordingly. If you’re looking for a shortcut, Microsoft Word can help you out, or a number of websites like citationmachine.net or easybib.com. Those are all fine options, but I think there’s an easier way. Whether you find your research using QuickSearch, one of the library databases, or even Google Scholar, most modern databases will automatically cite your sources for you, if you know where to look. Continue reading

As Seen on TV

I like to be entertained early and often. Once I dated a guy who took me to the movies weekly. I did not have strong feelings for him, but I really did love the movies. The break-up left me missing only first run feature films. It is no surprise then, when tasked with crafting a library research project, I would select a topic near and dear to my heart. I examined media, my first and only true love, and how it is related to reading choice.  Continue reading

Sometimes You Can Judge a Book by Its Cover

“Covers” by Henning M. Lederer on Vimeo

Way back in 2009, an observant blogger from the New York Observer noticed a “new trend” among booksellers. Rather than wrapping books in colorful paper dust jackets, some books incorporated the art directly onto their covers. It must have been quite an observation, since other bloggers repeated or quickly replicated the original blog. I can’t say I noticed at the time, so here is my contribution to the conversation, a mere eight years later. Continue reading

A swallow visits the LCW library: What we can learn “from the birds”

LCW gets an unexpected visitor

The other day at Lander College for Women, a bird flew into the building. We were advised to close the door of the library to prevent the bird from flying in during the window of time it took to catch and release the bird into freedom. We did not want our visitor, the bird dubbed Larry, to build a nest in our books! The excitement of the “bird alert” reminded me of the important metaphor that birds serve in various texts. Continue reading

Find Free Scholarly Research with Open Access Repositories

Here at Touro, like most colleges and universities, our students and faculty rely on peer-reviewed, scholarly journal articles to conduct their research. Touro Library subscribes to a large number of scholarly journals which can be accessed through our many databases. We think we’ve got things pretty well covered, but still, we are working on expanding our reach and offering the best access to peer-reviewed scholarly literature we possibly can. One area we are looking for this is in Open Access (OA). OA refers to material that is published online, for free, without most copyright and licensing restrictions. Much of it is published under a Creative Commons license. It is important to note that OA material is published with the full consent of the copyright holder, not pirated in any way. Scholarly journal publishing has never been a money-making endeavor for the writers so they are not giving up any kind of financial benefits by publishing OA. For more information on the various business models used by OA journals, and anything else you might want to know about OA, see Peter Suber’s excellent Open Access Overview.       Continue reading

What Are You Reading This Summer?

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One great way to spend a few free summer hours is to do some fun reading. The summer is a great time to fuel your personal interests by reading some new and exciting things. It’s also a good way for students to keep their minds engaged and continue learning over break. With the end of classes, students often find themselves with the opportunity to read items not mandated by their course curriculum. The LCW students that I spoke to are planning to read some great things this summer! Here is what a few of our students are looking forward to reading during their time away from classes: Continue reading

2016 Survey Results: Responding To Your Responses

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In December, we ran our annual User Satisfaction Survey asking students, faculty, and staff about their experiences with Touro libraries over the past year. Your responses give us insight into how we can improve our services and offerings. We value your feedback, so we’d like to share some trends we noticed and our responses to the most common issues mentioned. Continue reading