How to Find a Missing Article

When you’re hot on the trail of an article and suddenly the link is broken or the piece mysteriously vanishes, what can you do? Don’t panic! Here are a few things you can try:

Go directly to the database

If you are searching for an article in the QuickSearch bar on the Libraries website, and clicking on the link takes you to an error page, try going directly to that database and performing a search there. You can also take your search terms to other databases related to the subject you are researching, as the article might be available in a different place.

Check for open access options

Like the many Touro faculty who share an open access version of their publications in Touro Scholar, the authors of the paper you are looking for might also have shared their paper in an institutional repository. You might be able to locate an open access version of the article via a search in Google Scholar or by going directly to the institutional repository of the institution with which the authors are affiliated.

Contact a librarian

You don’t have to search alone! If you are having a challenging time finding the article you are looking for, reach out to your campus librarian for assistance. We can help you explore other places where your article might be hiding or help you find another option that suits your research needs.

Email the author

The author of the article you are looking for might be able to send you a copy of it via email. Many researchers are happy to share their work with students and colleagues, but remember that not everyone is able to do so, especially at this time; be patient if you try to get the article this way, and consider other options, especially if you need the article soon.

Request it through Interlibrary Loan

Because many libraries have closed their physical locations during the pandemic, interlibrary loan is limited at this time. Consider this your last choice option if you are not able to track down the article using any of the other approaches listed here and be prepared to seek other options if your request cannot be fulfilled.

Library Resources for Alumni

This post is from a series based on responses to the 2020 Library User Satisfaction Survey. If you have feedback throughout the year, please share your thoughts on the Libraries’ website here: www.tourolib.org/contact/suggestions

Your connections to Touro don’t end when you graduate —and neither does your access to library resources.

an open book
Photo by Stas Knop on Pexels.com

Touro alumni can use the library’s materials while in the library, although these materials cannot be checked out, and alumni also have access to any of the electronic resources the library provides access to while in the library.

And if you cannot make it into the library right now, you have continuing remote access to several databases, whether you graduated just two years ago or ten.

Some highlights include:

You can find all of the databases that allow alumni access here: https://touro-alumni.libguides.com/az.php

Finally, you might also find yourself in the archives. The Touro College Institutional Archives was created in 2007 to preserve the history of Touro College. There are many galleries and newsletters, newspapers, and yearbooks available online for you to peruse for photos of your classmates and favorite professors, and maybe even yourself!

ProQuest Research Companion

ProQuest Research Companion supports information literacy, writing, and research skills instruction, providing a companion to instruction sessions and allowing librarians and instructors to focus on teaching more complex research and writing principles.

A screenshot from ProQuest Research Companion

Developed by writing instructors and librarians, ProQuest Research Companion is comprised of ten learning modules and five interactive tools—all designed to automate the key elements of the research process.

Once you sign in with your TouroOne credentials, you’ll find videos, tools, and recommended resources to help you “Find Information,” “Evaluate Information,” and “Use Information.” The modules start by sharing how you can begin your research project and select a topic and progress through the steps to reflecting on your project and how you can improve.

Whether you are an experienced researcher or just starting your academic journey, ProQuest Research Companion can be a helpful tool.

Teamwork works: How faculty and librarians can collaborate for student success

Working with your Touro librarians can increase the ways in which you can support your students. With the spring semester approaching, here are some tips to make the most of this relationship.

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Photo by fauxels on Pexels.com
Share

Share your assignments with your campus librarians, so we can be prepared with resources and tools to assist your students when they reach out to us. Ensure there is a copy of your assignment in Canvas, so your students can share it directly with a librarian if they need to.

Clarify Needs

Talk to your students about the support the libraries can provide and what other support is available on campus. For example, the libraries can assist with finding and citing sources for a research project, while the writing center can assist with structuring a paper and checking grammar.

Resources

The libraries have a lot of resources to offer you and your students. Send us a list of the materials you’d like to use so that we can research whether the libraries have access to those and find alternatives to those we don’t, so that your students won’t have any extra hurdles to jump through.

Sources and Citations

Be clear about the kinds of sources you would like your students to use, whether they are peer-reviewed articles or primary sources; these terms might vary by disciplines, so provide as much information as possible about what you are looking for. And, be kind about citation requirements: choose a popular style (like APA or MLA) instead of a very subject-specific one, and focus on helping students understand why citation is important.

Information Literacy

Students may be savvy Instagram or Twitter users, but just because they can utilize technology doesn’t mean they have a good understanding of the information they are consuming. Students often overestimate their information literacy skills, so it may be a good idea to work with a librarian to offer an information literacy session or incorporate library resources to support them in finding accurate information.

We would love to partner with you, because we want all students to be successful. Please contact your campus librarian to learn more about how we can work together in the coming year and beyond.

This post was adapted from “Faculty: Do This! Working with Your Academic Librarian for Student Success” by Joe Hardenbrook.

Unlocking Links with LibKey

Do you need a journal article faster than you can say “database”?

You’re in luck! The TC Libraries are excited to share LibKey, which allows easy access to PDF downloads when using the QuickSearch function on the TC Libraries homepage.

As part of the Libraries’ BrowZine subscription, LibKey’s quick access means you can skip the work of navigating to the database and checking for access to an article there or seeking out an open access version. There is nothing you need to do to turn LibKey on; it is automatically enabled.

screenshot of quick search results showing

And, if you’re on the move, LibKey Nomad is an extension which allows you to find full-text articles in the Touro Libraries databases via citations across the web, from PubMed to Wikipedia. Once you have installed the extension in your browser, the LibKey icon will appear by links on other websites, allowing you to see if there is an available article.

screenshot showing the libkey nomad icon by

For help with your research at any stage, from finding articles to crafting citations, contact the Touro College Libraries or check out our Research Guides.

Find Free Scholarly Research with Open Access Repositories

Since this week is the official Open Access Week, (October 22-28), we like to draw your attention to the plethora of Open Access (OA) scholarly material that is available online via different repositories, some of which we have mentioned in this article and you can find through Touro Libraries.

OA refers to material that is published online, for free, without most copyright and licensing restrictions. Much of it is published under a Creative Commons license. It is important to note that OA material is published with the full consent of the copyright holder, not pirated in any way. Scholarly journal publishing has never been a money-making endeavor for the writers so they are not giving up any kind of financial benefits by publishing OA.     Continue reading

What’s for dinner? Answers through the ages from the NYPL

Lager Beer Saloon Menu, 1900
Kosher Victorian Restaurant menu, 1900 from NYPL menu collection: http://menus.nypl.org/menus/15689

We’ve all heard that avocado toast is the centerpiece of the millennial brunch, but have you ever wondered what your (great-)grandparents might have ordered when they were your age? Or maybe seeing the en vogue cocktails served at the Tavern on the Green in Central Park in years gone by might pique your interest? If you’re a history major or buff, perhaps you’d be keen to know how rationing during the war years affected restaurants? The NYPL’s Menu Collection (one of their many digital projects) can answer all those questions, plus raise a few more (mock turtle soup, anyone?). Continue reading

MLA: Help for Citing All Kinds of Sources

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I am a self-admitted nerd, and during the early January blizzard and sub-zero temperatures, I ventured out through wind and snow to join many fellow nerds at the MLA’s annual convention. Now, to most people, “MLA” is synonymous with burdensome citation rules, but the organization, whose full name is the Modern Language Association, actually encompasses academic research from all sorts of topics in literature and the humanities. The convention in January had panels by scholars on Shakespeare, fantasy literature, Renaissance epics, Leonard Cohen’s poetry, and many other topics near and dear to my heart.  Continue reading

Libraries are the Road to Take!

 

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Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash

While wandering through the woods of information, would you blindly follow a path because one of the trees has a beautiful signpost that appeals to you, even though you have not read the content or verified the source? Of course not. You would stop to read all of the signs before following the path; your choice would be educated from reading all the signs and verifying the source, so you would not end up in darkness.  Going with your gut is another uneducated choice and leads you down a shadowed path. Only through careful research and studying can you find the facts you are looking for.  While there are many resources to assist with research, one easy-to-use one is the library and your librarians. National Library Week is a wonderful time to get to know your library and the resources it offers you. Continue reading