Instructional Support Checklist

glenn-carstens-peters-190592-unsplash
Photo by Glenn-Carstens-Peters from Unsplash

Do you have readings you’d like to make available to all your students online?

  • E-Reserves – Post electronic copies of course readings for your students. We’ll take care of the securing the copyright clearance and uploading the documents. Contact your chief librarian or fill out the e-reserves submission form to get started.
  • E-books and Databases – If you’re looking for easily accessible and low-cost materials for your classes, our ebook collections, and electronic databases are a great resource. Link directly to most books and articles from BlackBoard, Canvas or email.
  • Open Educational Resources – You can use many free resources in your class, including high-quality peer-reviewed textbooks with instructor material. Tell us which commercial textbook you would like to replace, and we will show you what’s available for your discipline. Contact Juliana.terciotti-magro@touro.edu

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The First Annual Mid-Atlantic Digital Commons User Group Meeting

Carrie Levinson giving a presentation at MADCUG
The author mid-presentation. Photo by Juliana Terciotti Magro.

I’ve attended quite a few conferences on many different topics relevant to librarianship, but never had the opportunity to help organize one. When several people on the Digital Commons Google Forum started to speak about putting together a group just for those institutions in the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA, I wanted in. Continue reading

Staff Profile: Brandon Harrington

Harrington_Brandon
Brandon, our new library assistant at Starrett City in Brooklyn

Where were you born?

I was born and raised in central Connecticut.

Where else have you lived?

I moved from CT to Newport, RI for undergrad. Before moving to New York, I lived in Providence, RI for a time.

What languages do you speak?

While my speaking skills outside of English are pitiful, I have reading proficiency in German and can manage reading Spanish, French, and Italian with a dictionary. I have a background in Latin and intend to return to it eventually. Continue reading

Congratulations, Liping Wang!

Cataloging Librarian Liping Wang is retiring from the Touro College Libraries after almost 16 years. To celebrate, the Libraries threw her a surprise send-off party. Congratulations on your retirement, Liping!

Surprised Liping Wang
Liping Wang coming into the surprise party. The surprise worked!
Michoel Rotenfeld and Liping Wang
Associate Director of Libraries Michoel Rotenfeld presents Liping Wang with a card and her present.
Liping Wang holds her present
Liping Wang holds her present!
Group picture of library staff
Library staff got together to celebrate!

España sobre dues rodes: Parte Dos

(image: Jeff MacDonald, IRCO, Portland, OR)

If you’ve been reading this blog for some time, you may have noticed that my trips:

  • Are suddenly suggested by someone other than myself (or involuntary body part movements…or wine)
  • Are something I am a little too easily talked into going on
  • Get broken up into two parts
  • Include potentially perilous transitions between those parts

Of course, this could also all just be me and my flair for the overly dramatic.

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An Israel Travelogue

When temperatures hit the 30s °C (that’s 80s-90s °F), it’s time to leave my air-conditioned, windowless library located two floors underground in the Givat Shaul neighborhood of Jerusalem, and go touring.

This is how I found myself on an air-conditioned tour bus this past summer with former New Yorker and veteran tour guide Shalom Pollack, traveling through the southern Hevron hills, where the heat was in the low 40s °C (104-106 °F) in the shade!

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The Olympic Games

Person skating in a rink
The author, skating.

Every four years, I am tickled with glee that the Winter Olympics have arrived. I have come to discover that people prefer either the Summer or the Winter Olympics. They can like both, of course, but they are usually more partial to one. I am definitely more partial to the Winter Olympics, which is surprising, since I hate the cold. But there is something about how winter sports make the dark, cold season cozy and celebratory that helps me make it to spring.

About 3 years ago, I took up speed skating as a way to lose weight. I learned that the activity burns 500 calories an hour. I figured if I am going to suffer through a workout, I might as well get the biggest bang for my buck. The first time I tried it, my legs felt like someone was taking a blowtorch to them. My feet were sore with blisters. And my nose was running like a faucet (ice skating makes your nose run – bring tissues). I realized this was going to be a slow buildup of my body adjusting to this new activity. I read over some books on athletic training to get an idea on how to proceed. The key was to take it slow and steady. I skated in 10 minute segments with 10 minutes of rest. Gradually, I worked up to 15 minute segments with 5 minutes of rest.  Eventually I got to the point where I am at today which is a solid 90 minutes of skating with a 5 minute rest in the middle. It is amazing how the human body adapts and alters.

The following eBooks are available on sports training at Touro College Library:

Sports Performance. Kanosue, Kazuyuki.

Nutrition and Enhanced Sports Performance : Muscle Building, Endurance, and Strength.  Bagchi, Debasis.

Strength and Conditioning for Sports Performance. Jeffreys, Ian.

But getting back to the Olympics. The Olympics has always been about more than just athletic stamina and grace. It is also an extravaganza of politics and national agendas mixing. The underlying current is about the nations of the world interacting, competing, and making statements about other nations. In a way, the Olympics is a political summit. And as the 2018 Winter Olympics wrapped up in Pyeongchang this week, we saw a thawing of tensions between North and South Korea as both nations decided to have their athletes march into the opening ceremonies under a united Korean flag. They also had a united hockey team. However, North and South Korea marched out of the games separately at the closing ceremonies leaving many to ponder the message. In addition to the drama surrounding Korea, Russian athletes had to compete under the Olympic flag due to doping scandals in their homeland. This opened a lot of discussion and controversy regarding the IOC (International Olympic Committee) engaging in favoritism and corruption. The political football of the Olympics is not new. It has been a tradition since the Olympics started.

The following eBooks are available on the politics of the Olympics:

Activism and the Olympics : dissent at the games in Vancouver and London Boykoff, Jules.

The Beijing Olympics : Soft and Hard Power in Global Politics. Caffrey, Kevin.

Designing the Olympics : Representation, Participation, Contestation. Traganou, Jilly.

As far as the 2020 Summer Olympics go, someone else will have to blog about them. I am too busy celebrating summer to watch.

Contributed by Annette Carr, Business Librarian, 65 Broadway.