Learning How to Find the Truth in Information: A METRO Symposium Summary

Everyone has heard of fake news by now. It’s seemingly everywhere, and in all types of media. How do we wade through all this incorrect information and find out what the real story is?

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Last week, Library Information Literacy Director Sara Tabaei and I attended a METRO symposium entitled                        “(Mis)informed: Propaganda, Disinformation, Misinformation, and Our Culture.” The aim of this one-day meeting was to discuss the underlying issues and ways to teach about all of this incorrect information. It was also an opportunity to see METRO’s new location (which happens to be right by the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum!).

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Introducing Cabells Scholarly Analytics

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Navigate through the waves of predatory publishers with Cabells Scholarly Analytics!

We recently subscribed to a database called Cabells Scholarly Analytics. The library acquired it because there is a need for a resource that provides listings of legitimate academic journals and fraudulent journals all in one place. Now, let’s take a closer look at this database.  Continue reading

Which Way to the Bookstore? Contains new and updated information.

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If I had a nickel for every time a student walked into the Midtown library expecting to buy a textbook, I’d have a pocketful of change. Why do they come to this place, where shelves are lined with so many books, yet I cannot sell them a single one? Doesn’t that sound like a bibliophile’s bad riddle? (OK. Here’s one. What do you get when a librarian tosses a billion books into the ocean? …A title wave!) No seriously, where is the bookstore? Continue reading

My Internet Addiction

Internet, You Have My Undivided Attention!

 

 

 

 

 

The start of the day requires ritual, and each person’s daily ritual is different. Some people go to worship; some go for a run; some go for a cigarette. I go online. My day does not begin until I sit at the kitchen table with a cup of coffee and my Kindle Fire. I’ve got to tell you, that Kindle is my favorite thing. If I were Oprah, it would be at the top of my list. Continue reading

Quick & Easy Citations with Databases

Citations got you down? There’s an easier way! (CC image by Peter Alfred Hess)

When your professor asks you to cite your sources in APA (or MLA, AMA, APSA, ASFDKJ…), what do you do? If you’re a traditionalist, you might consult a style manual like Purdue OWL and type them out by hand, searching out each piece of information and formatting it accordingly. If you’re looking for a shortcut, Microsoft Word can help you out, or a number of websites like citationmachine.net or easybib.com. Those are all fine options, but I think there’s an easier way. Whether you find your research using QuickSearch, one of the library databases, or even Google Scholar, most modern databases will automatically cite your sources for you, if you know where to look. Continue reading

On Internships & eBooks

Me as a young librarian! (Photo by Debbie Melnick, Principal Law Librarian for New York City Civil Court Library, 2010)

Many moons ago, when I was but a young librarian and did not really know what a digital repository was and copyright laws were not yet solidified in my brain, I did a summer project for the New York City Civil Court Library as part of an internship. I was a recent graduate of library school and had never worked in a legal environment before, and was interested because I had enjoyed my Legal Librarianship class in my last semester of library school. Internships are a great way to gain much-needed experience without the pressure of a “real” position, so while I could I took advantage of many opportunities to intern and volunteer. I wanted to gain as much experience as possible before entering the working world. Continue reading

Finding Full-Text: Alternative to Article Linker

Frustrated trying to find full-text? Read on to learn a foolproof method! (image via flickr)

ArticleLinker can be a little temperamental, I admit. We’re working on getting some of the kinks ironed out, but if you do run into any issues, there’s an alternative method you should know about. If you know of an article that you’d like to track down, you can do so using the publication (journal, magazine, or newspaper) title. Continue reading

Proquest RefWorks on iPad

(CC0 image via Pexels)
(CC0 image via Pexels)

This post was updated on April 19 2017.

RefWorks is the newest addition to our suite of tools and resources for our students and faculty at Touro. It’s easy to use and can save you oodles of time saving, organizing, and citing your research, like with its one-click bibliography generator. It’s a lifesaver on a laptop, but will it work on your mobile device? Since many of our Health Sciences students use iPads in the classroom, in labs, and to complete their coursework—plus the Midtown, Midwood, and LCW branches of Touro Libraries offer iPads to borrow—I took a close look at how RefWorks works on iOS. Read on to see my findings and get tips to get the most out of the new RefWorks on iPad. Continue reading

It’s Official! RefWorks Comes To Touro

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Beginning this month, the new, totally redesigned RefWorks will be available free to everybody with a Touro.edu email address. Last year, Touro Libraries had a trial of the updated reference manager, first the beta version code-named Flow, and then the initial release. Faculty, students, and librarians alike liked the product so much that we are happy to announce our official subscription has begun.  Continue reading