Touro’s Seventh Annual Research Day

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Photo by Sara Tabaei

On Tuesday, May 1, 2018, Touro College held its seventh annual Research Day at the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine/Touro College of Pharmacy campus in Harlem.  Not only was this day a great opportunity for faculty and students to showcase their recent research in the form of poster presentations, it was also an opportunity to hear some renowned keynote speakers sharing their most recent research with our students, faculty, deans, and senior administration. 

In his welcoming note, Touro President Dr. Alan Kadish shared a story of a very young patient who had a rare disease called Batten disease. He went on to explain that though there is no cure for the disease yet, the doctors of this patient used translational research to stabilize the patient. Translational research is, according to Wikipedia, a rapidly growing discipline in biomedical research that applies findings from basic science to enhance human health and well-being. It aims to “translate” findings in fundamental research into medical practice and meaningful health outcomes to expedite the discovery of new diagnostic tools and treatments. With this story, Dr. Kadish conveyed how quickly science can progress when motivation and creativity exist. Continue reading

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MLA: Help for Citing All Kinds of Sources

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I am a self-admitted nerd, and during the early January blizzard and sub-zero temperatures, I ventured out through wind and snow to join many fellow nerds at the MLA’s annual convention. Now, to most people, “MLA” is synonymous with burdensome citation rules, but the organization, whose full name is the Modern Language Association, actually encompasses academic research from all sorts of topics in literature and the humanities. The convention in January had panels by scholars on Shakespeare, fantasy literature, Renaissance epics, Leonard Cohen’s poetry, and many other topics near and dear to my heart.  Continue reading

Money Smart Week

 

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Source:  ALA–MSW 2018

 

The entire month of April is Financial Literacy Month, but this week is also Money Smart Week. If personal finance is not something you usually give a lot of thought, now is a great time to build off tax season (and possibly a refund!) and to extend the spirit of spring cleaning to your bank accounts. There are many resources available to help you take control of your finances and make your money work for you. Of course, this is a place to exercise your information literacy skills, and to consult a certified professional where appropriate, but we have compiled a new Financial Literacy LibGuide to help you get started.  Continue reading

Libraries are the Road to Take!

 

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Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash

While wandering through the woods of information, would you blindly follow a path because one of the trees has a beautiful signpost that appeals to you, even though you have not read the content or verified the source? Of course not. You would stop to read all of the signs before following the path; your choice would be educated from reading all the signs and verifying the source, so you would not end up in darkness.  Going with your gut is another uneducated choice and leads you down a shadowed path. Only through careful research and studying can you find the facts you are looking for.  While there are many resources to assist with research, one easy-to-use one is the library and your librarians. National Library Week is a wonderful time to get to know your library and the resources it offers you. Continue reading

Happy Passover

Seder foods (Image courtesy of Wikimedia user Jonathunder)
Seder foods
(Image courtesy of Wikimedia user Jonathunder)

Passover is the one Holiday besides the New Year which is celebrated by a majority of all Jews from around the globe. The preparations for this Holiday very often drive people nuts.  The commandment is not to have any leavened product in your home during this 8 day period; this means that the house must be cleared of bread and all other such foodstuffs. And that’s on top of cleaning and cooking in preparation for the family gathering. Especially with small children in the household, it’s not hard to see why people get a little crazy at this time of year!   Continue reading

Staff Profile: Midtown Librarian Juliana Magro

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The author in front of the Iguazu Falls in Brazil.

My name is Juliana Magro, and I am the Information Literacy and Instructional Librarian at the Midtown campus. I was born in Brazil, and moved to the United States a few years ago. I speak Portuguese and English, but I can also read Spanish and Italian.

 

 

In Brazil, I lived in Rio de Janeiro for 2 years to complete my masters in Linguistics. Rio is a beautiful (although quite chaotic) city. My favorite spot there is a park called Parque Lage. This park sits at the bottom of the Corcovado Mountain, and used to be the residence of industrialists in the 1920’s. It’s a good place to go to with a book for a nice cup of coffee, and then to take a stroll through a patch of forest. Continue reading

Introducing Cabells Scholarly Analytics

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Navigate through the waves of predatory publishers with Cabells Scholarly Analytics!

We recently subscribed to a database called Cabells Scholarly Analytics. The library acquired it because there is a need for a resource that provides listings of legitimate academic journals and fraudulent journals all in one place. Now, let’s take a closer look at this database.  Continue reading

An Israel Travelogue

When temperatures hit the 30s °C (that’s 80s-90s °F), it’s time to leave my air-conditioned, windowless library located two floors underground in the Givat Shaul neighborhood of Jerusalem, and go touring.

This is how I found myself on an air-conditioned tour bus this past summer with former New Yorker and veteran tour guide Shalom Pollack, traveling through the southern Hevron hills, where the heat was in the low 40s °C (104-106 °F) in the shade!

Continue reading