A Moving Rosh Hashanah Prayer

May Your New Year Be Sweetened with Happiness
(Image via Flickr; CC BY 2.0)

Rosh Hashanah, in Hebrew, means Head of the Year. It is one of Judaism’s holiest days and begins this year the night of Sunday, September 9th until the night of Tuesday, September 11th. There are many moving prayers and traditions designated for the High Holy days, but I would like to highlight one prayer that goes back to approximately the 10th or 11th century called U-Netaneh Tokef (“Let us tell the mighty holiness of this day”). Continue reading

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Bs’d Shavuot—Festival of Weeks

 

(Image courtesy of zingyyellow via Wikimedia)
In Biblical times, when the Holy Temple stood in Jerusalem, Shavuot was the second of three holidays during which pilgrims visited the sacred city and the house of G-D. Shavuot annually marks the completion of 7 weeks since the great exodus from Egypt. On the 50th day (which was the 6th of the month of Sivan), the Torah and the Ten Commandments were given at Mt. Sinai.

Continue reading

53rd Street Library: An Interview with Leib Klein

Student artwork in the halls
Student artwork in the halls

How many years have you been working at this site?

20+ years. I started off part-time, but then became a full-time librarian. I have also worked occasionally at the Avenue J location.

Entrance to Boropark 53rd Street
Entrance to Boro Park 53rd Street

What is the name of your site and where is it located?

It’s the Boro Park 53rd Street Library at the School of Lifelong Education. We’re located at 1273 53rd Street, Brooklyn, NY 11219. Contact us by phone at 718-871-6187 x30017.

What is the history of your site?

The School of Lifelong Education (SLE) Program was established in 1989. Associate and Bachelor degrees are offered.

For a brief period, the SLE moved to 45th Street, but then we returned to 53rd Street. Continue reading

A Moving Rosh Hashanah Prayer

(via flickr
(image via flickr)

Rosh Hashanah, in Hebrew, means Head of the Year. It is one of Judaism’s holiest days and begins this year the night of Sunday, September 13th until the night of Tuesday, September 15th. There are many moving prayers and traditions designated for the High Holy days, but I would like to highlight one prayer that goes back to approximately the 10th or 11th century called U-Netaneh Tokef (“Let us tell the mighty holiness of this day”). Continue reading